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Friday, April 21, 2000


Thursday, April 20, 2000

In an hour or two the family and I will load up the car and head down to Chattanooga for Easter. I will be gone all day tomorrow fishing. Fishing, I tell you! Anyway, I won't be able to update the site much, though I did just sign up for ATT dial up service, so I may do a bit of surfing. It's going to be strange to be at modem speed again. Saturday I will meet with some friends about some possible work, so it won't all be fun and games, but I am looking forward to being free of this computer for a while.
From CNN, an article about Web-Caching, a technology that threatens the end-to-end enviornment of the internet that has fostered so much innovation (see post below): Is Web caching bad for the Internet?
NECP is embroiled in controversy because some IETF leaders say one likely use of NECP - as an interception proxy - violates the Internet's fundamental design. ... Interception proxies violate the IP standard by breaking the end-to-end nature of the communications technology and causing interoperability problems.
An Excellent article at The Standard on why so much good stuff happens online: Architecting Innovation
The key to the Internet's extraordinary innovation is that it doesn't allow a term like "allow." It's architected to disallow it. The Internet is built on a principle called "end-to-end." First described by Net theorists Jerome Saltzer, David Reed and David Clark, end-to-end means the network does not choose how the network will be used. Control, or intelligence, is placed at the "end." The network is to be kept simple, incapable of discrimination. What is allowed in the Internet is what users demand. The innovations that are permitted are those that users find useful. No central or strategic actor gets to decide how the network will evolve.
Very funny: eNormicom!
You must be determined to create massive economic results in the next 10 minutes. Ready? Then read on.
Via Zeldman.

Wednesday, April 19, 2000

Purple monkey dishwasher; get it Jason?
From CNET.com: Yale drops Napster after legal pressure
Yale University, one of three schools named along with Napster in a lawsuit filed by rock group Metallica earlier this week, has told students it will ban use of the company's software on its college networks.
Next month they will ban VCRs, and hopefully by 2001 there will be no cassete recorders on the Yale campus.
EXTRA! EXTRA! New security hole in a Microsoft product! From CNET.com: Microsoft browser bug may access private files
The flaw lets a malicious Web site operator use a script to open a new browser window. That window opens with the computer owner's security safeguards. Because IE normally lets the local user find files on the hard drive as well on the Web, the maliciously scripted window can display any file on a person's computer.
I was excited about fooling around with PNG images, but the Current Status page at this PNG site has left me a bit discouraged. PNG should have
alpha transparency, which allows one to do nifty effects like drop-shadows and anti-aliasing against any background, but with the exception of Mac MSIE 5.0, the Big Two are still locked in the dark ages of GIF-style binary transparency or worse. Netscape Navigator doesn't do any sort of PNG transparency, and Windows MSIE treats any palette index that isn't completely opaque as completely transparent--depending on your image, say goodbye to most of it! (To make up for that, it doesn't support 32-bit RGBA transparency at all.)

Is there any hope? Perhaps just a little. Microsoft's just-released MSIE 5.0 for Macintosh has, from all indications, perfect PNG support.
Navigator doesn't do any transparency! Until there is wide (nearly complete) browser support for at least GIF comparable features, PNG will never take off.
There are some very cool java applets at sumea. Via Metafilter.

Tuesday, April 18, 2000

Can each of you please review this site (www.slashdot.org) and tell me whether or not you find this site informative from a tech point of view. I am curious as to whether or not this would be a good partner in a case where our client is from the tech industry.
Thanks,
Eric
From the Standard: American Psycho on the Cutting Edge of Net Marketing
"If you get these e-mails for a month, Patrick Bateman becomes a part of your life," says Tara Kole, manager of new media and acquisitions for Lions Gate. "You can't not see the movie after that kind of involvement."
Unless of course you hate Patrick Bateman and his psycho schtick.
From Wired: Net CEOs: 'Shallow and Greedy'
"The dot-com generation will get squeezed by more skilled baby-boom managers and aggressive Generation Y newcomers. Former dot-com managers will end up working for their elders and their juniors," he said.
Why, that's crazy talk!
I thought I had signed up for all of these, but now I find out about another internet hard drive app: Xdrive.
This is too good to be true: RotCam. Via the funniest blog out there, winerlog
More from CNET.com: Standards body wants online forms brought up-to-date
With XML playing an increasing role in linking information stored in databases to Web sites, the W3C is touting the XML-friendly XForms as a tool for making forms a more flexible and useful part of that link.
Sounds good to me.
From CNET.com: Patent demands may spur Unisys rivals in graphics market
At least one Unisys licensee already has indicated that it plans to limit its use of GIFs, adopting a free alternative known as PNG (pronounced "ping") for distributing graphics files to customers. Accuweather, which sells meteorological data to news outlets and other organizations, said in a memo to its customers on Friday that the switch to PNG would take full effect May 12, although Accuweather will continue to hold the rights to use GIFs on its own Web site
Here comes the the png revolution! Well, not really.
From The Standard: Cherry-Picking The Web
Sites like CallTheShots.com, Octopus.com, Quickbrowse.com and Yodlee.com make it easy for people to combine content from multiple Web sites on a single page. Some of them have yet to fix on a business model, however, and none has thoroughly explored the legal questions their technology raises.
I haven't tried any of these services yet, but they look interesting.
Please ignore that last comment. It was just one of my fabricated online personalities talking.
Slashdot.org. Been here before? Interesting site just read about in the WSJ. :-)
If you like spam, you'll LOVE this article. Via baylink.
Intimate (v.) as defined in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary:
1 : to make known especially publicly or formally : ANNOUNCE
2 : to communicate delicately and indirectly : HINT
I can't believe 1) That I didn't know the first definition of this word, and 2) That the first and second definitions seem to be at odds with each other. Is there a word for that? A word that has two opposite definitions?
Please ignore that last comment. It was just one of my fabricated online personalities talking. The real answer is: yes, of course.
Apparently, we are being studied as we go about our online lives. The article raises this question:
Can information gathered online, where people often fabricate identities and personalities, be considered scientifically sound?
I shall now attempt to answer the question: no.
World Mouseclicking Competition!
Have you got what it takes to be a Big Fast Finger round town? Or are you a bit of a limp clicker?
Nadav's weblog, antenna, is really great. A ton of excellent links on "interface, interaction, and experience."
From ZDNet, the best article yet on the Frontpage98 vulnerabilites.

Monday, April 17, 2000

For E.T.: Macster. Now even Mac users can be cool!
Super Marketing: ads from the comic books. A must see.
Also, I added my 5k submission to the experiments section. It's an HTML special character guide. I wish I hadn't waited until the 12th hour to do it; I think I could have made it much better.

Here are my original comments on it.
New Section! I added a news feed section to glish.com today. For now it is just Tomalak's Realm links. Soon it we be links from moreover.com and more! I like XML!
Rob Neyer:
In Cleveland ... Chuck Finley struck out four Rangers in the third inning. Finley has now recorded four strikeouts in one inning three times ... and he's the only pitcher to do that more than once. That, my friends, is a freak stat.
Same War, New Battlefield
Remember the browser wars? It's been almost five years since Bill Gates declared Netscape's browser a threat to Microsoft, and a competitor with the potential to undermine Windows and commodify personal computer operating systems.
I watched South Park The Movie last night, and I thinks it's time for one of these. Thanks D.
From the NY Times: Developing Technology for Internet Music Sales
Ready or not, the record companies are under pressure to make their music available over the Internet. They need to be responsive to investors, to take advantage of a potentially huge market opportunity, and to head off the persistent problem of online music piracy.
I hope that the record labels die. Soon.
Another Update on the Frontpage98 backdoor; apparently, it's as bad as first reported, just different.

Here's the Microsoft Security Bulletin.
Update on the Frontpage98 backdoor; apparently, it's not as bad as first reported.
CNET News.com - Can Napster be stopped? No!
The music industry is about to undergo a change that is, at the very least, 10 times more important than the launch of the compact disc. Everything will change. And if that's not enough, once the bandwidth is available, the movie and book industries will be next.
Well, maybe this can stop it: crapster.
This article makes me less eager to try absinthe.
Did Janelle Brown not get it? Or do I not get her?
We'll see how this works: I set up my account at Byliner to check for new online articles by writers I select. I only have it looking for articles by Carl Steadmen, Camille Paglia, and David Edelstein and a couple of others. I need to pay more attention to who writes the articles I enjoy, because I know there are others I could track...

Link by way of calamondin.

Sunday, April 16, 2000

Taylor got metasyntactic variable working, AND he found the Webmonkey tutorial he did in 96 using it as a demonstration of image swapping. These are fond memories for me.
Netscape's Challenge
Netscape 6's Gecko rendering engine, however, does a fine job of displaying Web pages identically across Linux, Windows, and Macintosh.
Cool: eye fatigue test.
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