onLine weblog archive

Saturday, April 29, 2000

An extremely impressive 5k entry: Blocks.
What a weird, weird blast from the past. Via Megnut, it's Dynamite!: The Magazine. For some reason I have vivid memories of this page of bummers; it's been like 20 years.
I missed this in November, but Camworld just pointed it out to me: How the Web was almost won.
A very good read from Technology Review: The End of Moore's Law?
In the last 100 years, engineers and scientists have repeatedly shown how human ingenuity can make an end run around the difficulties posed by the laws of nature. But they have been much less successful in cheating the laws of economics. (The impossible is easy; it's the unfeasible that poses the problem.) If Moore's Law becomes too expensive to sustain, Moore said, no easy remedy is in sight.
Enormicom listed in looksmart!
Technology-focused brand strategy firm introduces its naming, slogan and e-dentity defining tools. View client list and get contact details.
Via Camworld.
You don't have to read it. You can just look at the animation. etoy interview.
Need a new desktop? Courtesy of V.
The more I think about this, the more annoyed I get. It is an over-written silly little rant. Yeah, DoubleClick sucks. Yeah, browsers suck. What is your point? Stop using cookies and start using ALT tags? Oh wait, here is the point:
Understand, this is not a call to return to amber text on a black screen, but rather an observation of the state of play that is shaping the web we are building and the developers that follow us.
That clears it up.

Friday, April 28, 2000

That's what I wanted to say. But I wouldn't have said it as well anyway.
Winerlog.editthispage.com has turned just brutal:
My Paradigm or the Highway!!!!! "Outliners aren't the most intuitive writing interface..." No duh. I think the only person who uses an outliner to write for the Web is Dave and 7 other people!!!!!!! We took a scientific poll and that's what we came up with!!!!!!!!!
So now there is a ditributed protest site for the elian_true animation. What I want to now is, what does this mean:
Wazzup!!! To every tax paying American that felt they should have sent Elian Gonzalez to join his Mother (in the ocean).
Huh? If you care to comment, please head to Metafilter.
A classy web shop here in town has a nice motto:
Remember! Anyone can plug you in. Only Show-Me Online turns you on.
Also, just heard in a radio ad:
Vacuum World: where business just sucks.
A particularly Suckian story from A List Apart: Time to Close the Web?
Here is a sobering perspective on XML, strangely entitled "grieve with me, blue master chickenz."
This is a good article from The Standard on the Elian_True parody. It has links to all the relevant URLs.
From The Salt Lake Tribune:
A former Brigham Young University student has sued the school and his classmates after a 1996 Shakespeare project left him blind in one eye. Nicholas Humphrey alleges in a federal lawsuit filed Monday that a BYU instructor agreed to allow a small group of students to present a modern version of a scene from the play "King Lear" using a gun that fired paint-filled pellets. No one in the group was wearing protective clothing or goggles, the suit alleges, and Humphrey was struck in the eye. Humphrey alleges that the university was negligent in allowing the students to use a paintball gun in class and is seeking unspecified damages.
That is horrible. Really, a tragedy.

Thursday, April 27, 2000

Here's a good one from ZDNet: Pentagon cracks down on ... PowerPoint.
Chicago Cubs/Houston National League recap on ESPN
There have been 46 home runs in 12 games at Enron Field this season.
Which is why I vote for the nickname "Ten Run Field."
AP tries to kick popular Elian animation off the Internet
An animated parody of the Budweiser "Whazzup?" commercial using the principal parties of the Elian Gonzalez saga has disappeared from the Internet due to legal threats from The Associated Press.
No it hasn't.
I don't buy this at all: Web Content Won't Always Be Free. It assumes that the big boys will win, that independent content producers will disappear, that people only want to read content from established brands. Sure, some idiots people will eventually be willing to pay for Newsweek articles online, but there will always be other sources willing to give better content away. You may be asked to pay for some things in the future, but there will always be free content online. It's the nature of the beast.
From Wired News: Backdoor Exposes Credit Cards
(Editor's note: This story has been modified since its initial posting. The original publication of this story included the password in question.)
oops!
Stuff to think about RE usable interfaces: Web Design Guidelines. Some of it common sense, some of it controversial.
IBM to support SOAP.
When Bad Design Becomes the Standard:
I have never been a great fan of this design approach (a colored stripe down the left side of the page to contain the main navigation links) because the colored navigation rail takes up about 20% of the pixels on the screen, even after the user has scrolled to the bottom of the page. Navigation is a secondary concern for users who are on the Web for the content.
What drives me crazy about Jakob is that he often refuses to take more than one consideration into account when making his pronouncements. In the above quote, Jakob assumes that the best way to display content is to cram it up as high on the page as possible while filling the full width of the browser screen. If that is true, then yes, get rid of the left navigation bar. However, if you like your content readable and in a reasonably sized column, then you should have some space to spare along the edges. Also, what about all the secondary content (every hear of a sidebar, Jakob?) that can be fit into the bar below the navigation? Gimme a break.
Freenet: a public piracy service.
I love it when Rob Neyer gets all worked up: Don't blame the pitchers.
I hate to sound insulting because I know everybody means well, but anyone who seriously thinks that it's not the small ballparks and the big hitters and (maybe) the lively baseball, but rather the pitchers ... well, you're missing something. You're stuck in a way of thinking that limits not only your understanding of baseball, but quite possibly other things in your life, too.
Also read this article on the theories as to why home runs are being hit at record rates, and also this.

Did I mention that antenna is freaking great?
Internet Statistics Unsound:
There is a reason to be depressed, but it does not stem from logging on. Rather, we should be worrying about the interaction between reporters and academics that produces and brings us news about this new medium.

Wednesday, April 26, 2000

Of all the lawsuits like this, I think pets.com has on of the better cases I have heard of. Possibly the best case ... for me to poop on.
A depressing opinion: The basic failure of XML is its premise.
So why does anyone think that a standards body built around XML will work? The world can't even agree on the same video standard--NTSC or PAL--electrical outlets or DVD formats. The only thing we can agree on is the user interface for a telephone and the basic necessities of the automobile.
A little overdrawn, but any rant against marketing gets a link from me: The Real Power of Wireless.
Let's try out a couple of scenarios. As you read, think about what kind of world you would want to live in...
I think I am inclined to agree with this opinion on the Elian story.
...there was no pretty or entirely peaceful way to enforce the law in a situation like this one. Sorry if the pictures didn't turn out perfectly; the operation sure did.
However, it amazes me that so many Cubans think the boy should have been left with his relatives.
Decent article on the recent GIF situation from The Standard: The Latest GIF Tiff.
Joakim Borgstrom's 5k entry

Tuesday, April 25, 2000

It takes a while, but it's worth it: skipintro.com.
You have to admit, the Priceline.com commercials featuring William Shatner are pretty funny.
Not responsive enough, confusing how the app window relates to your other browser windows, like Deepleap and Third Voice: CrowdBurst.
New article from A List Apart: Meet the DOM.
Giving Altoids a run for their money in the "cool breath mint website" category: SMINT.
I was all scheduled to get DSL installed here at the home office last Monday, but I cancelled because of all the nightmare tales I have heard from people who have suffered serious DSL down time. Here's another such tale, from Zeldman: Jeffrey Zeldman Presents: 4/25/2000.
We run an Internet business. We pay for high-speed access. For a week we've had blackouts lasting up to four hours, followed by connectivity as brief as fifteen minutes.
ISDN may not be the fastest thing out there, but it has been rock solid for me for 3 years. I'm glad I played it safe.
Poke Alex In The Eye: The Game is more fun than you think it is. Really.
I am impressed with sixfoot6.
If these walls had ears: What goes on inside AOL
''I probably get credit for being the guy that dumbs down the Internet,'' says Schuler, who in 1994 designed what became AOL's familiar warm, fuzzy look. ''I take it as a compliment.''
Blech.
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